Tuesday, 22 May 2018

More exercise leads to more youthful arteries

According to US research exercising two to three times a week (30 minutes per session) over a lifetime led to more youthful middle-sized arteries supplying blood to the head and neck.
Though, people who exercised four to five times per week - roughly the amount recommended by NHS guidelines - had healthier large central arteries as well as healthier middle-sized ones.
They said the larger arteries are the ones that supply blood to the chest and abdomen.
However, the research did not take into consideration factors such as diet, social background and education in their analysis which would also have had an impact.

Doctors explain Michael Jackson's impossible dance move

MANJUL TRIPATHI
Neurosurgeons have described in detail how Michael Jackson achieved biomechanically impossible dance moves in his music video Smooth Criminal.
In the 1987 routine, Michael leans from the ankle at a 45 degree angle, while keeping his body straight as a rod.
The illusion, which many have tried to copy, was thanks to specially designed shoes and the artist's core strength.
The spine experts warn others against attempting the potentially injurious but mind-boggling move.
Manjul Tripathi and colleagues from the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh, India, say in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine: "Most trained dancers with strong core strength will reach a maximum of 25 to 30 degrees of forward bending while performing this action. MJ pulled off a gravity-defying 45 degree move that seems unearthly to any witness."
RUBEN RAMOS
How MJ did it
If a person were to attempt the Smooth Criminal lean, they would notice that the bulk of the strain to strike the pose moves to the Achilles tendon in each ankle, rather than the erector spinae muscles of the back.
This allows for only a very limited degree of forward bend, even for someone matching Michael's strong athletic abilities, explains Assistant Prof Tripathi.
Michael got the extra degrees of tilt thanks to some fancy footwear.
A v-shaped slit in the bottom of each heel of his spats slotted onto a strong nail or "hitch member" driven into the ground, allowing the dancer to pivot and lean further forward, for the gravity-defying move.
MANJUL TRIPATHI
Prior to the patented footwear invention, Michael had relied on supporting cables and a harness around his waist to create the illusion.
It's said that he and two Hollywood colleagues borrowed the footwear idea from US astronauts' boots, which can be docked to a fixed rail when working in zero gravity.
But even with specially designed footwear and the support of the hitch member, the move is incredibly hard to pull off, requiring athletic core strength from strengthened spinal and lower-limb muscles, say the doctors.
"Several MJ fans, including the authors, have tried to copy this move and failed, often injuring themselves in their endeavours," they caution.
Dr Tripathi said: "The chances of injury to the ankle are significant. You need strong core muscles and good support around the ankle. It's not a simple trick."

Source: BBC.co.uk

Scientists Urged to Find Cure for Rare Virus The HTLV-1 Virus That Can Cause Leukemia

The pathogen which is similar to the way HIV spread has also been dubbed a cousin of HIV.
Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was first discovered in 1980, but it is believed the ancient virus was first present in nonhuman primates 40,000 to 60,000 years ago.
According to medical scientist, the virus does not negatively impact all carriers of the disease, but in some patients, it can cause spinal cord injury, inflammatory conditions, problems with mobility, and an aggressive form of leukemia.
“Ninety percent of the time, this will not trouble you, you will not be aware of it… But there’s another side of the coin, which is: Then why do we bother with it? Well… it does cause serious disease in the remaining ten percent, and it causes a very aggressive white blood cell cancer. It’s called adult T-cell leukemia,” Dr. Graham Taylor, professor of human retrovirology at Imperial College London, told Healthline.
“This is probably one of the most aggressive blood cancers, very difficult to treat, and with the best efforts… people still die. Fifty percent are dead within eight months. So that’s why we can’t ignore it,” he explained.

Monday, 21 May 2018

More than 6000 Lagosians benefited from health services

Lagos State Commissioner for Health, Dr. Jide Idris who disclosed this last Friday explained that residents benefitted from free health services ranging from consultation and treatment for common ailments as well as screening for various ailments.

Said he, “Already, a total of 6,072 Lagosians at Ajeromi and Ifelodun LGA&LCDA have benefitted from these services and we expect more residents to turn out enmasse and take advantage of the opportunity presented by the programme to get expert care for common ailments and other free health services offered through the mission”.

Sunday, 20 May 2018

Ebola Outbreak: MSF to Open 3 Additional Treatment Centres in DR Congo

According to reports, International humanitarian organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF or Doctors Without Borders) will set up three additional facilities in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo) to provide medical aid to people affected by the ongoing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak in the country’s Equateur province.
“We put in place a treatment center, and we plan to put in place three other ones. One is in Bikoro, and another will be in Mbandaka.
“The two other ones we are waiting for more epidemiological information to check where is the best location to set up those treatment centers,” Axelle Ronsse, the emergency coordinator at MSF Operational Centre Brussels, told Sputnik.

There's still very little evidence that health apps work

A group of researchers from the Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice at Bond University in Queensland, Australia conducted the study, which was published in Nature's new Digital Medicine journal. 
This is their findings:
"Smartphone popularity and mHealth apps provide a huge potential to improve health outcomes for millions of patients," the researchers wrote. "However, we found only a small fraction of the available mHealth apps had been tested and the body of evidence was of very low quality. Our recommendations for improving the quality of evidence and reducing research waste and potential harm in this nascent field include encouraging app effectiveness testing prior to release, designing less biased trials, and conducting better reviews with robust risk of bias assessments. Without adequate evidence to back it up, digital medicine and app 'prescribability' might stall in its infancy for some time to come."

Head and neck cancer patients report lessened symptoms when monitored remotely

Below is the report of a new study carried out on head and neck cancer:
“Our study generated evidence on how newer technologies can be integrated into cancer care relatively easily and improve patient outcomes without interfering too much in a person’s daily life,” Susan K. Peterson, lead author in the study and a professor in the  Department of Behavioral Science at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, said in a statement. “This study was done during a rather intense period in the patients’ care for head and neck cancer. The system helped their physicians to provide valuable support that ultimately resulted in lower symptom severity.”

"This study demonstrates the power of leveraging smart technology to improve the care of people with cancer. These tools helped simplify care for both patients and their care providers by enabling emerging side effects to be identified and addressed quickly and efficiently to ease the burden of treatment. I hope that these or similar technologies will be broadly available to patients soon," ASCO President Dr. Bruce E. Johnson said in a statement. 

More exercise leads to more youthful arteries

According to US research exercising two to three times a week (30 minutes per session) over a lifetime led to more youthful middle-sized ar...